The League does a variety of work around voting and the elections.

Voter Service activities include voter registration, candidate and issue debates, and impartial analysis and presentation of ballot measures. Members moderate and keep time at debates; study ballot measures and then explain them at gatherings large and small; work on or off camera at our in-studio debates including preparing them to be accessible online; and register youth and others to vote.

LWVMC has a contract with the county Elections Department to stock libraries, post offices, and town halls with voter registration forms. Members choose an area in the county to cover and keep stocked with VR forms.

 

Pros and Cons of the State Propositions

Each election, local leagues of the Leagues of Women Voters do presentations throughout their communities on the Pros and Cons of the propositions on the ballot. We do this public service as part of our mission to help citizens be informed voters. These presentations are objective and nonpartisan, and are not associated with our advocacy mission.

Contact Elaine Biagini (ebiagini@earthlink.net or leave a message for her: 415-507-0824 ) if you would like to invite the Marin League of Women Voters to make a presentation to your organization or gathering.

Why Local Elections Matter

For many voters, the most important election — perhaps the only election in which they vote — is for president.  These races are covered by the media for months, even years prior to election day.  The candidates are likely to be much better known, and the issues are presented as having national, even global, importance.

The case can be made, though, that it is in local government elections that voters can have the most power and the greatest influence.

A member who once served on a school board said to a friend in the next town, “If you see me shopping in your market, it’s because I’m in a hurry.”  She meant, “If I shop in my market, I’ll get stopped by voters who have school district issues to discuss.”

At the local level, voters can attend board, commission, and committee meetings; read and understand minutes and staff reports; serve on citizen advisory committees; call officials at home; even stop them in the aisle of the supermarket.

It is the local government election where the local branches of the League of Women Voters feel the greatest responsibility and make the most effort with candidate debates and voter registration and information activities. If you are looking for information as the June election approaches, please visit our site again. If you are interested in helping others become informed voters, please join us!